Monthly Archives: October 2007

George Monbiot Heats Up Call for Solving Climate Crisis (Part 2)

George MonbiotIn part two of this two-part interview, British journalist George Monbiot discusses his new book, Heat: How to Stop the Planet from Burning, with CWR co-hosts Bill Baue and Francesca Rheannon. He touches on the irony that increased energy efficiency can lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions and the promise of high-voltage DC cables in transmitting renewable energy over long distances. We end the conversation discussing the paradox that love both creates climate change (in the form of what Monbiot calls “love miles” or the distance traveled and carbon emitted to visit loved ones) and holds the key to the solution, as compassion for humanity is the greatest catalyst for changing our carbon intensive systems.

Heat: How to Stop the Planet from Burning

Monbiot.com

SocialFunds article citing Heat: Emissions Trading Commodifies Carbon, But Does It Really Help Solve Climate Change?

George Monbiot Heats Up Call for Solving Climate Crisis

George MonbiotIn part one of this two-part interview, British journalist George Monbiot discusses his new book, Heat: How to Stop the Planet from Burning, with CWR co-hosts Bill Baue and Francesca Rheannon. Monbiot applauds the acknowledgment of the climate crisis in awarding of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, but criticizes recipient Al Gore for undermining the Kyoto Protocol when he was in office. He also presents the case for carbon rationing under the “Contraction and Convergence” framework. He emphasizes the necessary role of government regulation in solving the climate crisis, and discusses the paradoxes of how “regulation enhances the sum of human freedom” and how our carbon-intensive lifestyles create a “fantasy of freedom.”

Heat: How to Stop the Planet from Burning

Monbiot.com

Global Commons Institute: Contraction and Convergence

SocialFunds article citing Heat: Emissions Trading Commodifies Carbon, But Does It Really Help Solve Climate Change?

Launching the Solidarity Economy

Emily Kawano, executive director of the Center for Popular Economics in Amherst, Massachusetts, discusses the launch of the US Solidarity Economy Network coming out of the US Social Forum in Atlanta in June 2007. Co-hosts Francesca Rheannon and Bill Baue ask Kawano to explain the defining features of Solidarity Economy–how big an umbrella it is, how it distinguishes itself from the competitive framework of current neoliberal economics, and how it can promote true social and environmental sustainability.

Center for Popular Economics

US Solidarity Economy Network