The Myth of Clean Coal

Don't Get BurnedLeslie Lowe

Utilities and coal companies are pushing to open over a hundred new coal-fired power plants in the US. But activists, investors, communities, consumers, and scientists are pointing to financial, regulatory, environmental, and social risks that far outweigh the potential benefits of coal. And they are pulling back the veil from the myth of clean coal, exposing that king coal is a naked emperor. Carbon capture and storage, the key to coal’s “clean” claims, has years of technical and economic hurdles to cross. Leslie Lowe, director of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibilty’s Energy & Environment Program, speaks with us today about the risks of committing to a future of new coal plants.

Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility

ICCR Report: Don’t Get Burned: The Risks of Investing in New Coal-Fired Generating Facilities

New York City Comptroller letter asking Department of Energy to review tax-exempt status of bonds for new coal plants

CWR Headlines:

Airlines Flying to and From Europe Will Have to Pay for Emissions
Coal plants get thumbs upand thumbs down
Leading Climate Scientist calls Coal and Oil CEO’s Criminals
Clean coal gets a boost from the US Dept of Energy

James Hansen Congressional testimony: Global Warming Twenty Years Later: Tipping Points Near

CWR ViewPoint:  read (Thanks to our partner CSRwire for posting text of CWR commentaries.)

Yochi Zakai

Yochi Zakai of Co-op America points out that clean coal is dirtier than it’s cracked up to be. He comments on the recent Georgia court ruling against a new coal plant proposed by Dynegy, and Co-op America’s ongoing activism aimed at that company and others in the industry.

Co-op America “Stop the Coal Rush” Campaign