Monthly Archives: August 2012

The Plastic Purge: Beth Terry

The average American generates between 88 and 120 pounds of plastic waste per year. Imagine what it would mean for you to cut that down almost entirely. What lifestyle changes would you have to make? This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio asked herself that same question and then tried to answer it – embarking on a mission to reduce her plastic use as much as possible and tell the world how she did it. In her new book, “Plastic Free: How I Kicked The Plastic Habit and You Can Too” author and accountant Beth Terry provides more than an instructional manual; she illustrates how conscious behavior can blossom into advocacy for wider change.

“Watershed” Moment with James Redford

Named for the rich red dirt that once colored its rushing waters, the Colorado River has been dammed, diverted and drained to a trickle of its former self. Host Alex Wise recently watched the documentary film Watershed which provides the story of the Colorado River through the voices of its beneficiaries, from a flyfisherman to a rancher to a Navajo council member. The film is narrated by Robert Redford, and today on Sea Change Radio we have a chance to talk with James Redford, who worked alongside his father as one of the film’s producers. He explains how lessons from what’s happening to the Colorado River can help inform conservation efforts around the globe, and why he believes this important film can enable the formation of a new water ethic.

 

Ocean Conservation: Pearls of Wisdom

Ocean pollution is something most of us are well aware of whether it be from seeing plastic bags washed ashore or images of marine life stuck in oil spills – but ocean acidification is a more latent phenomenon that scientists are still learning about. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks first with the editor of E: The Environmental magazine, Brita Belli, about her recent feature on ocean acidification and how oysters have been an unlikely source for better understanding the problem – and possible solutions. Then, the second part of our discussion with Seth Berry, an Assemblyman from Maine who’s not only actively involved in local environmental political issues, he also helps run a sustainable aquaculture business.

Science + Policy = Progress

We know greenhouse gasses are a problem. We know we need to make some drastic changes, and soon, to stave off an inexorable slide into planetary dysfunction. What we don’t know is how to make sure those changes happen. How do we identify the good policies, based on sound science? This week’s guests on Sea Change Radio are each advancing sustainable public policy in their own ways. First, host Alex Wise speaks with Indiana University biology professor, Richard Phillips, who’s just published an important study on how much trees actually do (or don’t) mitigate carbon emissions. His findings will help ensure more accurate calculations for CO2 emissions from countries like the United States that rely on forests to offset their high rates of pollution. Next, we hear from Seth Berry, an Assemblyman from the State of Maine, who gives us an insider’s perspective on the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, also known as ReGGIe, a cap-and-trade system for carbon emissions from power plants with 9 participating US states and some parts of eastern Canada.