Monthly Archives: April 2013

Hot On The Carbon Trail: Bill Baue & James Leaton

BillBaueNewJamesLeatonThe Carbon Tracker Initiative and the Carbon Disclosure Project are two ongoing, vital efforts to help us better understand how much fossil fuels and greenhouse gasses companies are emitting. First, host Alex Wise speaks to Sea Change Radio co-founder Bill Baue who explains how the projects work and what needs to happen to act on the findings of these organizations. Next, we hear from the Research Director of the Carbon Tracker Initiative, James Leaton, to discuss the methodology, impact and real-world application of his team’s work.

*Here’s a link to Bill McKibben’s Rolling Stone piece that was inspired by Leaton’s research.

Ceres Conference Preview: Lester Snow and Bennett Freeman

BennettFreemanLesterSnowThe Ceres Conference is an annual gathering where organizations as different as the Sierra Club and Shell come together to discuss ways to accelerate the transition to a sustainable world. On the eve of the conference which takes place May 1st and 2nd in San Francisco this year, we thought it would be worthwhile to get a sneak peek at some of the Ceres speakers.

This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from two Ceres speakers. First, we are joined by Lester Snow, the executive director of the California Water Foundation. He gives us an overview of some compelling water issues concerning the American West. Then, host Alex Wise speaks to Bennett Freeman of Calvert Investments, an investment company that has been on the forefront of the socially responsible investment movement since the 1980s.

Securing The Foodshed: Philip Ackerman-Leist

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There is little disagreement that urban farming translates into increased access to local, sustainable, and healthy food, and that this is a very good thing. But how is it done? What are the success stories of urban farming? And what exactly is a “foodshed?” Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio is Philip Ackerman-Leist, an author, educator and farmer. We learn about foodsheds and discuss how urban farming has proliferated in cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Oakland. He also tells host Alex Wise about how today’s global menu and palate are creating a carbon-intensive food transport problem, and shares some of his best thinking on the ways to get a new generation of Americans engaged in helping ensure our food security future.

Down The Line: Steven Mufson on the Keystone XL Pipeline

SteveMufsonCoverAre you interested in knowing the facts about the Keystone XL pipeline? Well, depending on the source, the “facts” vary wildly. Proponents tout the Alberta tar sands as the new Saudi Arabia, claim that the Keystone pipeline will bring 100,000 jobs and help get the US off of foreign oil. Critics, on the other hand, say the jobs are more like under 50, that all the oil will be exported, that tar sands crude is highly prone to spills, and that this project would endanger pristine wildlife habitats. So who is right? This week on Sea Change Radio we hear from longtime Washington Post energy correspondent Steven Mufson who has recently completed a book on the topic. Based on meticulous, hands-on research, Mufson’s work reminds us that when two competing interests have conflicting sets of facts, someone’s facts are fiction.

Michael Skelly on Wind Energy: Blowing Over Barriers

MichaelSkellyWindTransmissionPromoters and detractors of wind power have one point of agreement – both see the transmission lines that carry wind energy as inefficient and very expensive to build. If wind power is going to fulfill its potential as the natural, pristine and infinitely renewable energy source that it could be, this obstacle will have to be overcome.

This week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Michael Skelly, has a solution that he thinks will move us past the transmission obstacle and into an era of efficient wind power use and transfer. His company, Clean Line Energy Partners, believes it has a better way to transport wind energy, using a new technology based on the old standard direct current electricity: high voltage direct current transmission lines. Listen now as Skelly describes to host Alex Wise how a 19th century technology may be the answer to the 21st century energy question.