Monthly Archives: October 2013

Carbon Footprints: from Corporations to Keychains

JamesLeaton1GrahamBerghThis week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from the Research Director of the Carbon Tracker Initiative, James Leaton. He discusses his organization’s ongoing effort to inform the public about the quantities of fossil fuels and greenhouse gasses various companies are emitting. His team’s findings have been important talking points for Bill McKibben and 350.org‘s recent divestment campaign.

Next, host Alex Wise speaks with Graham Bergh, the founder of Resource Revival, a small company that collects tons of bicycle parts each month from bike shops all over the US. to create beautiful, low carbon-footprint, everyday products like picture frames and candle holders.

Empowered By Light + California’s Lone Wolf

MoiraHanesJoeDonnellyToday’s show starts off in Zambia. Worldwide, an estimated 1.5 billion people do not have access to electricity. In Zambia more than 80% of the population has no access to electricity according to the World Bank. It has been shown that providing access to power can be tremendously beneficial to people’s education, their health and their livelihood.

Our first guest on Sea Change Radio this week is Moira Hanes, who describes what her relatively small nonprofit, Empowered By Light, is doing to try to change this big problem, harnessing solar power in sun-drenched areas like sub-Saharan Africa.

Next, we come back to California where, after 80 years of extinction, a lone wolf has appeared in the Golden State. Author Joe Donnelly recounts the tale of California’s lone wolf who wandered in from Oregon and unwittingly raised a controversy between environmental groups who want to protect the possible resurgence of wolves in California, and ranchers and others who don’t.

Green For All: Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins

livestream-logoPhaedraEllisLamkinsPolitical opponents of the green movement have been depressingly successful not only in attacking the facts that underpin the struggle, but in knocking down some of its most eloquent and powerful figures, relegating to the margins what should be a universal concern: a healthy world that can be sustained into the future.

Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, one of those eloquent and powerful figures. In spite of personal attacks from those who would silence her, Ms. Ellis-Lamkins perseveres in the fight to nurture a green economy that helps to empower traditionally disenfranchised communities.

Picking up where Van Jones left off, Ms. Ellis-Lamkins is the chief executive officer of Green for All, which works to promote the green economy through policy advocacy, networking, engagement of the business community, and by mentoring a new generation of environmentalists of color. She talks about the challenges of breaking into a field dominated by white, middle-class men, how issues of urban poverty and the environment are inextricably tied, and what needs to happen to change the “makers and takers” narrative that pits ideological rhetoric against our shared need for global health.

Beyond Oil: Michael Marx on Tar Sands and Pipelines

MichaelMarx2113212191_9e8cf0ddef_qMost of the time when we hear about “bureaucratic delays” it is with a sigh and a moan (especially this week when the Federal government is almost completely shut down). But when it comes to the Keystone XL Pipeline, a bureaucratic delay is a welcome reprieve for the activists and environmental groups fighting the controversial plan to build a pipeline that would transport tar sands crude oil from Canada through the US.

This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with Michael Marx, the Director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Oil campaign. They discuss the new economics of tar sands oil, the options for the petroleum industry if the Keystone is blocked, and how the fight over the pipeline has helped to energize groups like his.

Jeff Orlowski: Chasing Ice

"Chasing Ice" director, Jeff Orlowski, Greenland Ice Sheet, June 2009ChasingIce_smThe acclaimed documentary film Chasing Ice chronicles the work of photographer and environmentalist James Balog, who has been at the forefront of documenting earth’s melting polar ice cap. This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from the film’s director, Jeff Orlowski, who started out as a part of Balog’s team and eventually assumed the role of documenting the documenter.

We learn about the difficulties of filming in some of the most remote places on earth, as well as the contradictory feelings that Balog and the other members of the Extreme Ice Survey felt while capturing these beautiful yet tragic earth-changing events.