All posts by Alex Wise

Jeremy Hance on Big Conservation (re-broadcast)

Do you ever wonder what impact well-known wildlife groups like the Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund are having? Our guest today on Sea Change Radio is Jeremy Hance, an environmental journalist whose recent four-part series for Mongabay.com, “Conservation, Divided,” thoughtfully investigates how the field of global wildlife conservation has changed over the past 30 years. In his discussion with host Alex Wise, Hance provides an overview of his investigation, evaluates the effectiveness of the four big global conservation groups, and talks about the philosophical and strategic debates that have emerged as these non-profits struggle to stop mass extinction.

Rev. Leo Woodberry on Climate Justice (re-broadcast)

How does one cultivate environmental activism in the deepest of red states? Is the current situation in the White House dividing Americans further, or expanding the progressive tent? This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss these issues and more with the Reverend Leo Woodberry, a nondenominational pastor from South Carolina who is thoroughly committed to fighting climate change. Rev. Woodberry talks about his upcoming ten-state Justice First Tour, the upsides and downsides of raising awareness of climate change in the South, and the overlap between the Civil Rights and environmental movements as we mark the 50th anniversary of the passing of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

PurpleAir Founder Adrian Dybwad

Northern California’s now infamous Camp Fire was not only the largest, longest, and deadliest wildfire in the state’s history, it also produced record amounts of smoke. Schools closed, there was a run on protective masks, and people were fashioning do-it-yourself air purifiers because there were none left in stores. And it looks like we will only see an acceleration of wildfires in the future. This grim forecast has brought a surge in traffic to websites that monitor air quality like AirNow, Weather Underground, and PurpleAir. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with the founder and CEO of PurpleAir, a company that sells laser air quality sensors for home use at a reasonable price, and posts all the results in real-time on its site. We discuss PurpleAir’s business model, its unique brand of crowd-sourcing technology, and examine the ways that it casts the world in a different, and sometimes frightening, light.

Put A Cork In It

What do cork, coffee cups, lettuce, and excessive travel have in common? They are all areas of personal choice that have an environmental impact, and they are all things we will be discussing with our guest today on Sea Change Radio. Lloyd Alter is a design professor as well as an editor at TreeHugger.com. This week he joins us and expounds on the virtues of cork, a surprisingly sustainable alternative to fossil-fuel-based products for sound-proofing, insulation, home-building, and, of course, bottling wine. We also talk about the waste generated by ubiquitous coffee-to-go, the diminishing need for travel in the era of electronic communication, and what Alter posits to be the idiocy of lettuce. As many of us think about making New Year’s resolutions for 2019, Alter gives us some ideas as to what we might put on our lists.

Richard Heinberg on Our Bonus Decade

If you’re someone who’s curious about the geopolitical implications of carbon fuel and the ecological havoc it wreaks, you’ve probably come across some of Richard Heinberg‘s work. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with this senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute who has authored over 13 books and regularly ponders the past and future of humanity and the earth in his Museletter. We discuss the global debt crunch, the search for tight oil, and the concomitant acceleration of climate change. Heinberg also tells us his thoughts on negative emissions technologies and regenerative agriculture, and explains why he refers to the past ten years as “our bonus decade.”

Mark Schapiro: Reaping What You Sow

There’s no time better than after a holiday of feasting to remember where we get our food. Ultimately, most of our complex recipes begin with the simple seed. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to author and environmental journalist Mark Schapiro to discuss the current state of agribusiness and his book Seeds of Resistance. We take a look back at his last book, Carbon Shock, to see how it has weathered the past five years of increased climate change-related events, discuss the unlikely feud over corn nuts and examine some of the valuable work of leading seed advocates around the globe.

Midterm Thanks: John Stoehr + Emily Atkin

This week, as we inventory the things for which we are thankful, many of us may include some of the midterm election results in our accounting. Today on Sea Change Radio, we hear the second half of our discussion with John Stoehr, of the New Haven Register and The Editorial Board newsletter. We examine how Democrats have handled the gun debate over the past couple of decades, and talk about the possibility of Beto O’Rourke running for president in 2020. Then, we hear from Emily Atkin, a staff writer for The New Republic, who thinks that while there were victories for which environmentalists can be thankful, the failure of three different states to pass climate change-related bills on November 6th was a troubling reminder of the hard work that lies ahead.

John Stoehr: A Lovely Day for Democrats

Did you know that in last week’s election, only half of eligible voters turned out? And that turnout was surprisingly robust as election prognosticators expected it to be more in the 35 to 40 percent range. Well, smart political strategists are trying to change the political landscape by engaging the significant piece of the pie that is eligible non-voters. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to John Stoehr, an opinion columnist at the New Haven Register and publisher of The Editorial Board, to get his thoughts on the recent midterm elections. We try to make sense of the results of last Tuesday’s election, examine voter suppression tactics in places like Georgia and Florida, and talk about the impact of door-to-door canvassing.

All Creatures Great and Small: The Vanishing Vaquita

How splendid would it be if humans could somehow find a way to truly co-exist with the rest of the planet’s creatures? This week on Sea Change Radio, we focus on two people doing what they can to protect endangered species around the globe. First, we speak to Brooke Bessesen, an author and wildlife researcher whose new book about a small, rare type of porpoise in the Sea of Cortez called the vaquita is facing possible extinction. Then, we take a look back at our 2017 discussion with Topher White. His organization, Rainforest Connection, up-cycles defunct cell phones with solar charging technology and then places them strategically in rainforests all over the world to monitor human activity like poaching and deforestation.

Made In The Shade: Erik Hoffner on Agroforestry

Occam’s Razor is a principle that tells us that the simplest solution to a problem tends to be the correct one. Farmers around the world are abiding by this philosophy in droves by practicing agroforesty, an ancient agricultural technique that supports biodiversity while simultaneously sequestering carbon. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn all about agroforestry from Erik Hoffner, an editor at Mongabay. Hoffner takes a look at examples of agroforestry efforts around the globe, examines recent investments into the sector and shows how it stacks up to large, industrial agricultural systems. As you’ll see, sometimes the best answers are right under our noses the whole time.