Ramez Naam on the Green New Deal, Pt. 2 + Sunscreen Bans

If you’ve been wondering what people mean when they talk about a Green New Deal, today’s episode of Sea Change Radio should help. This week we air the second half of our discussion with technologist Ramez Naam. Last week Naam shared some of the specifics of the Green New Deal. This we talk about the best way to pitch any plan to the American public, whether a measure for restricting individual consumption ought to be included in the plan, and the importance of considering vulnerable populations around the globe when crafting sound climate policy. Then, with summer kicking off, we revisit our conversation with Craig Downs of the Haereticus Institute, to learn about which sunscreen ingredients to avoid and which are safe for fragile marine ecosystems.

The Ramez Naam Plan For De-Carbonization, Pt. 1

Whether or not we use the name Green New Deal to describe a set of aggressive long-term policies that will help humanity in the fight against climate change, most rational people agree that the status quo is completely unacceptable. The potential of a Green New Deal is that it could pave the way for some great minds to devise concrete proposals for reducing greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with one of those great minds, Ramez Naam, a futurist and technologist who’s crafted his own sort of Green New Deal. We delve into the nuts and bolts of Naam’s proposal and the problems it’s trying to solve, as he makes the case for why we may actually see bipartisan support for such a proposal.

Roger Gottlieb: Philosophy and the Environment

When you see someone littering a plastic bag into the street how do you judge that person? What about the person who stands by watching the litterer and does nothing? And what about the person who supports the policy-makers who want to dismantle the EPA, or support other steps that undermine the health of the planet? This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome Roger Gottlieb, a philosophy professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, to discuss his new book Morality and the Environmental Crisis. We look at the moral conundrums and the bitter divisions among this country’s citizens over things as fundamental as clean air and water. Gottleib talks about effective ways to engage people to whom you may be diametrically opposed politically and the intersection of religion and environmental policy.

Climate Pioneers: Warren Washington + Kelly Gallagher

Since 1973, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement has been bestowed upon people who have made a significant impact in the fight for a sustainable planet. Last week on Sea Change Radio, we spoke with noted activist climate scientist Michael Mann, who was one of two recipients of this year’s Tyler Prize. This week, we are honored to speak with the other Tyler Prize Laureate, Warren Washington, to learn about the beginnings of his groundbreaking career as an atmospheric scientist. Dr. Washington was the second African American to receive a PhD in meteorology. He’s a former chair of the National Science Board, and currently a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. After our conversation with Dr. Washington, we chat with this year’s Tyler Prize panel moderator Kelly Sims-Gallagher, a professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, about the evolving intersection of global affairs and climate science.

Michael Mann: Agency and Urgency

Back in 1999, a team of scientists published a graphic depiction reconstructing northern hemisphere temperatures for the previous 1000 years. The steep increase from the 1900s on inspired the scientific community to give this visual a clever nickname: the hockey stick graph. This week on Sea Change Radio, we sit down with Michael Mann, the lead researcher on that study that introduced a generation to the notion of climate change. He is widely published and has received a number of awards, the most recent being the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement in April of 2019. In our conversation, we talk about why academics should bust out of the ivory tower, examine the climate change denial movement, and explore how the adage, “the best defense is a strong offense,” has served him well.

John Stoehr: Let’s Impeach the President

We have our hands full at Sea Change Radio just trying to cover important stories relating to the environment and social justice. But we also recognize that what’s happening in the broader political landscape has a profound ripple effect on environmental and social policies. So today on Sea Change Radio we are focusing on the presidency and the rule of law. Now that the Mueller report has been submitted to the Department of Justice, calls for impeachment of President Donald Trump have begun to reach a fever pitch. Our guest today is John Stoehr of the New Haven Register and The Editorial Board. We discuss the question of whether Democrats in Congress should be moving ahead with articles of impeachment. And for those who are eager to impeach, we ponder whether it is because it’s smart politics or because it’s the right thing to do?

Lloyd Alter: Transportation Puzzles

The industrial revolution ushered in an era of more efficient transportation. As history has shown us, the impact of our ability to move easily across town and across the planet is complex. It has made the world smaller but it has also given rise to the climate crisis. This week on Sea Change Radio we speak to TreeHugger‘s Lloyd Alter about innovations in the transportation space. First, we look at one of the cleanest, oldest and best forms of modern transport: the bicycle. We look at the latest designs in e-bikes, discuss whether or not they will come down in price and become more ubiquitous, and examine the gender gap in cycling. Then we talk about the threat that cheap flights and booming ridership pose for the planet, and the future of self-driving cars and ride-sharing.

Falter: Bill McKibben’s Latest Warning

Environmentalists have been talking for a long time about the threat to the planet. Now, a prominent voice is directing our attention to a related threat: he says our very humanity is in peril. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome back author and environmental leader Bill McKibben. The founder of 350.org, McKibben most notably spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement. His new book is Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? While his thesis may seem grim, the book includes a call to action and engagement. In our conversation we discuss the new book, how climate change activism is disrupting right wing plans, and what people can and must do to advance and support a sustainable future.

Georgina Gustin on the Farm Bureau

You may or may not have heard of the Farm Bureau but it is one of the most powerful lobbying organizations in this country, representing over six million members. And what does the Farm Bureau advocate for? More than you might think. As this week’s guest on Sea Change Radio, Inside Climate News reporter Georgina Gustin, explains, the Farm Bureau has been pushing conservative policies for over four decades now. Gustin gives us a better understanding of what the Farm Bureau does, whom it represents, and the environmental threat that it poses. Then, we revisit our discussion with Zero Mass Water CEO Cody Friesen who explains his company’s unique technology that turns humidity in the air into drinking water, using solar energy.

From Sea to Shining Sea: Jeff Boehm and David Abel

Oceans cover about 70% of our planet, and represent over 95% of all of the earth’s water. The human impact on the ocean includes temperature rise, coral bleaching, ocean acidification, and changing chemical composition of the water – all of these things, of course, have an effect on the organisms that live in these vast ecosystems. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a look back into the archives. First, we revisit our discussion with Jeff Boehm, the Executive Director of the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, CA as he talks about the work his organization does to protect seals up and down the Pacific coast. Then, we speak with Boston Globe reporter David Abel about the surprising resurgence of Atlantic cod.